Fernand Khnopff – Listening to Schumann

One of my favorite works by  the Belgian painter Fernand Khnopff is “Listening to Schumann”; you can feel the intensity of the music by the posture of the sitter:


His “Head of a Woman” is also terrific, and you can see clearly why he was such an influence on Klimt:

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Mary Cassatt – In the box

Image taken from Wikipedia

This belongs to the American painter Mary Cassatt. I think you can see here the influence of Degas, who was her friend. I actually like to think that these girls are watching the singer from the Degas painting, “The Singer with the Glove”

Though most likely they are just checking out the people at the concert.

 

On a different topic;I was improvising this half an hour ago. I am thinking of adding some electronic sounds or drums to it. Yeah, maybe I will do that at some point

After recording that I tried to go for a fast version, just for fun (I think I like the slower one better)

Speed

Rain, Steam and Speed – The Great Western Railway, by J. M. W. Turner. Image taken from Wikipedia

The British painter J. M. W. Turner went from painting things accurately to becoming a master at suggesting reality (he was therefore an important influence to some impressionists). I feel the sense of movement and speed from the train comes from the background being barely recognizable; it seems to be disappearing as the train moves

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This reminds me of that short story by Kafka,”The Wish to Be a Red Indian”

The Wish to Be a Red Indian
If one were only an Indian, instantly alert, and on a racing horse, leaning against the wind, kept on quivering jerkily over the quivering ground, until one shed one’s spurs, for there needed no spurs, threw away the reins, for there needed no reins, and hardly saw that the land before one was smoothly shorn heath when horse’s neck and head would be already gone. (from The Complete Stories of Franz Kafka)

Mother of God, no matter how many times I have read the short stories by Kafka, they are mind blowing. And what an amazing painting. I shouldn’t post these stuff at night, I get hyper and then cannot sleep.

Frida Kahlo – Viva la vida

This is the last painting by Frida Kahlo, and she finished it shortly before she passed away. It is quite likely she knew her time was over, so she added the inscription “viva la vida” to one of the watermelons. Viva la vida can mean “live life”, or (most likely) something close to “long life live”, but more as an exclamation (like “hurrah for life”).

Events

This is the story: My friends M and N found a lost huskie yesterday (M has 3 huskies already). The other dogs were not too thrilled to see this stranger, but apart from some odd looks and growling they were fine. That night we went out to a nice restaurant, and had oysters, scallops and then an amazing steak (with a Malbec and then a Bonarda)

Afterwards we went to M’s house. N had in her head this song by Gotye (I had never heard it before), so they gave it a try (posted here with their permission of course!):


Trying to figure out how the song went we ended up finding this cover on Youtube, which is remarkable (by  Walk off the Earth)


Today M managed to get in contact with the owners of the lost huskie (I think M liked the idea of keeping it).

Later on I started strumming the guitar, and improvised this. Maybe one day I will follow it, or do a proper recording of it.

 

And that is what happened. True story.

Danzón – Arturo Márquez

I was looking today for Danzón (Danzón  is actually a traditional Cuban dance), by the Mexican composer Arturo Márquez, and found this version onYoutube. It is directed by the Venezuelan conductor Gustavo Dudamel.

Speaking of Dudamel, here he is headbanging to the Fifth of Beethoven (1st movement)

And to show how eclectic he can be, here he is with the Puerto Rican band, Calle 13